Aleksandr Dugin

Aleksandr Dugin
Александр Дугин
Aleksandr Dugin 13981126000.jpg
Dugin in 2018
Born
Aleksandr Gelyevich Dugin

(1962-01-07) 7 January 1962 (age 60)
EducationMoscow Aviation Institute (no degree)
Spouses
Children2, including Darya
EraContemporary philosophy
RegionRussian philosophy
School
InstitutionsMoscow State University (2008–2014)
Main interests
Sociology, geopolitics, philosophy
Notable ideas

Aleksandr Gelyevich Dugin (Russian: Александр Гельевич Дугин; born 7 January 1962) is a Russian political philosopher,[6][7] analyst, and strategist, who has been widely characterized as a fascist.[8][9]

Born into a military intelligence family, Dugin was an anti-communist dissident during the 1980s.[10] Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Dugin co-founded the National Bolshevik Party with Eduard Limonov, a party which espoused National Bolshevism, which he later left.[11] In 1997, he published Foundations of Geopolitics, in which he outlined his worldview, calling for Russia to rebuild its influence through alliances and conquest, and to challenge the rival Atlanticist "empire" led by the United States.[12][13][14][15] Dugin continued to further develop his ideology of neo-Eurasianism, founding the Eurasia Party in 2002 and writing further books including The Fourth Political Theory (2009).[12][10]

Dugin also served as an advisor to the Chairman of the State Duma Gennadiy Seleznyov (Communist Party)[16] and as an advisor to the Chairman of the State Duma Sergey Naryshkin (United Russia).[17] He was the head of the Department of Sociology of International Relations at Moscow State University from 2009 to 2014, losing the position due to backlash over comments regarding clashes in Ukraine.[18] Dugin also briefly served as chief editor of the pro-Kremlin Orthodox channel Tsargrad TV when it launched in 2015.[19]

His influence on the Russian government and on president Vladimir Putin is disputed.[12] He has no official ties to the Kremlin,[19] but is often referred to in the media as "Putin's brain",[20] though others say his influence is exaggerated.[15][21][22][23]

  1. ^ Борис Исаев (2005). Геополитика: Учебное пособие (in Russian). Издательский дом "Питер". p. 329. ISBN 978-5469006510.
  2. ^ Lukic, Rénéo; Brint, Michael, eds. (2001). Culture, politics, and nationalism in the age of globalization. Ashgate. p. 103. ISBN 9780754614364. Retrieved 12 October 2015. Dugin defines 'thalassocracy' as 'power exercised thanks to the sea,' opposed to 'tellurocracy' or 'power exercised thanks to the land' ... The 'thalassocracy' here is the United States and its allies; the 'tellurocracy' is Eurasia.
  3. ^ "Alexander Dugin's 'The Fourth Political Theory'". 4pt.su. 24 July 2013.
  4. ^ Teitelbaum, Benjamin R. (2020a). War for Eternity: The Return of Traditionalism and the Rise of the Populist Right. Penguin Books Limited (published 2020). ISBN 9780241431078. OCLC 1235958794. Wikidata Q107266101.
  5. ^ Porter, Tom (16 August 2017). "Charlottesville's alt-right leaders have a passion for Vladimir Putin". Newsweek. Retrieved 13 May 2022.
  6. ^ Burton, Tara Isabella (12 May 2022). "The far-right mystical writer who helped shape Putin's view of Russia – Alexander Dugin sees the Ukraine war as part of a wider, spiritual battle between traditional order and progressive chaos". The Washington Post. Retrieved 21 August 2022.
  7. ^ "The Most Dangerous Philosopher in the World". Big Think. Retrieved 13 April 2022.
  8. ^ Multiple sources:
  9. ^ Burton, Tara Isabella (12 May 2022). "The far-right mystical writer who helped shape Putin's view of Russia". The Washington Post. Washington D.C. Retrieved 21 August 2022. In the early 1990s, he co-founded the National Bolshevik Party with controversial punk-pornography novelist Eduard Limonov, blending fascist and communist-nostalgic rhetoric and imagery; edgy, ironic (and not-so-ironic) transgression; and genuine reactionary politics. The party’s flag was a black hammer and sickle in a white circle against a red background, a communist mirror image of a swastika. The party’s half-sincere mantra? 'Da smert' (Yes, death), delivered with a sieg-heil-style raised arm.
  10. ^ a b Tolstoy, Andrey; McCaffray, Edmund (2015). "MIND GAMES: Alexander Dugin and Russia's War of Ideas". World Affairs. 177 (6): 25–30. ISSN 0043-8200.
  11. ^ "Russia: National Bolsheviks, The Party Of 'Direct Action'". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 29 April 2005.
  12. ^ a b c Cite error: The named reference guardian-bio was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  13. ^ Shekhovtsov, Anton (2018). Russia and the Western Far Right: Tango Noir, Abingdon, Routledge, p. 43.
  14. ^ "A Russian empire 'from Dublin to Vladivostok'? The roots of Putin's ultranationalism". Los Angeles Times. 28 March 2022. Retrieved 29 March 2022.
  15. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference bloomberg was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  16. ^ Eurasian Mission: An Introduction to Neo-Eurasianism, Arktos (2014) p.26
  17. ^ Shaun Walker (23 March 2014). "Ukraine and Crimea: what is Putin thinking?". The Guardian.
  18. ^ Cite error: The named reference BBC 2014 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  19. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference reuters-bio was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  20. ^ Multiple sources:
  21. ^ Cite error: The named reference :1 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  22. ^ Cite error: The named reference :2 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  23. ^ Cite error: The named reference :3 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).

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