Dayton Agreement

Dayton Peace agreement
General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina
DaytonAgreement.jpg
Seated from left to right: Slobodan Milošević, Alija Izetbegović, Franjo Tuđman initialling the Dayton Peace Accords at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base on 21 November 1995.
Drafted10 August 1995 (1995-08-10)
Signed14 December 1995 (1995-12-14)
LocationWright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, U.S.
Signatories
Parties
LanguageEnglish

The General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, also known as the Dayton Agreement or the Dayton Accords (Serbo-Croatian: Dejtonski mirovni sporazum / Дејтонски мировни споразум), is the peace agreement reached at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, United States, on 21 November 1995, and formally signed in Paris, on 14 December 1995. These accords put an end to the three-and-a-half-year-long Bosnian War, one of the Yugoslav Wars.

The warring parties agreed to peace and to a single sovereign state known as Bosnia and Herzegovina composed of two parts, the largely Serb-populated Republika Srpska and mainly Croat-Bosniak-populated Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The agreement has been criticized for creating ineffective and unwieldy political structures and entrenching the ethnic cleansing of the previous war.[2][3]

  1. ^ "Summary of the Dayton Peace Agreement on Bosnia-Herzegovina". www1.umn.edu. 30 November 1995. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  2. ^ Levene, Mark (2000). "The Limits of Tolerance: Nation–State Building and What It Means for Minority Groups". Patterns of Prejudice. 34 (2): 19–40. doi:10.1080/00313220008559138. S2CID 144296663. Consider, instead, one contemporary parallel, Bosnia: the degree to which the international community via the Owen-Vance plan, or even the later Dayton accord, actively promoted or endorsed the destruction of a multi-ethnic society; the degree to which it helped to facilitate the creation of a greater Serbia or an enlarged Croatia; the degree to which it was, at the very least, an accessory after the fact to both 'ethnic cleansing' and sub-genocide.
  3. ^ Malik, John (2000). "The Dayton Agreement and Elections in Bosnia: Entrenching Ethnic Cleansing through Democracy". Stanford Journal of International Law. 36: 303.

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