2016 shooting of Dallas police officers

2016 shooting of Dallas police officers
Part of mass shootings in the United States
2016 Dallas police shooting memorial service.jpg
Memorial service for the five police officers killed in the shooting.
LocationMain Street and S. Lamar Street, Dallas, Texas, United States[1]
Coordinates32°46′46.4″N 96°48′15.4″W / 32.779556°N 96.804278°W / 32.779556; -96.804278Coordinates: 32°46′46.4″N 96°48′15.4″W / 32.779556°N 96.804278°W / 32.779556; -96.804278
DateJuly 7–8, 2016
8:58 p.m. – 2:30 a.m. (CT)
TargetWhite police officers in Dallas[2]
Attack type
Mass shooting,[3] shootout, ambush
Weapons
Deaths6 (including the perpetrator)
Injured11
PerpetratorMicah Xavier Johnson
MotiveBacklash to police brutality[5][6][7]

On July 7, 2016, Micah Xavier Johnson ambushed a group of police officers in Dallas, Texas, shooting and killing five officers, and injuring nine others. Two civilians were also wounded. Johnson was an Army Reserve Afghan War veteran and was angry over police shootings of Black men. The shooting happened at the end of a protest against the police killings of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, which had occurred in the preceding days.

Following the shooting, Johnson fled inside a building on the campus of El Centro College. Police followed him there, and a standoff ensued. In the early hours of July 8, police killed Johnson with a bomb attached to a remote control bomb disposal robot. It was the first time U.S. law enforcement used a robot to kill a suspect.[8]

The shooting was the deadliest incident for U.S. law enforcement since the September 11, 2001 attacks, surpassing two related March 2009 shootings in Oakland, California, and a November 2009 ambush shooting in Lakewood, Washington, which had each resulted in the death of four police officers and the shooting deaths of both suspects. It was the second-deadliest targeted attack of U.S. law enforcement officers in history; and the largest since the Young Brothers massacre of 1932 resulted in the deaths of six law enforcement officers in Missouri.

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference nbcdfw was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  2. ^ Wash, Stephanie; Jacobo, Julia; Shapiro, Emily (July 9, 2016). "Dallas Shooting Suspect Micah Johnson Had Rifles, Bombmaking Materials in His Home, Police Say". ABC News. Retrieved May 30, 2017.
  3. ^ Cite error: The named reference WashPost.Lone was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ "Dallas Gunman Micah Johnson Used Assault-Style Rifle: Law Enforcement". NBC News.
  5. ^ "Dallas Police shed light on gunman's possible motives". ABC News. July 8, 2016. Retrieved July 10, 2016. The suspect said he was upset about Black Lives Matter. He said he was upset about the recent police shootings. The suspect said he was upset with white people. The suspect stated he wanted to kill racist white people, especially white officers.
  6. ^ Bruton, F. Brinley; Smith, Alexander; Chuck, Elizabeth; Helsel, Phil (July 7, 2016). "Dallas Police 'Ambush': 12 Officers Shot, 5 Killed During Protest". NBC News. Retrieved July 7, 2016.
  7. ^ Shapiro, Emily; Jacobo, Julia; Wash, Stephanie (July 9, 2016). "Dallas Shooting Suspect Micah Xavier Johnson Had Rifles, Bomb-Making Materials in His Home, Police Say". ABC News. Retrieved July 9, 2016.
  8. ^ Thielman, Sam (July 8, 2016). "Use of police robot to kill Dallas shooting suspect believed to be first in US history". The Guardian. Retrieved August 8, 2019.

From Rich X Search The Next Generation Search Engine

Copyright 2022 Rich X Search